On this day, March 26, 1793

On this day, March 26, 1793

On this day, March 26, 1793, John Hugh Smith Barry was baptised in Fulham Parish. He was the son of James Hugh Smith Barry and Ann Tanner, whose long-term relationship was never solemnised although they had five children together. As Continue reading

On this day, March 21st, 1845

On this day, March 21st, 1845

On this day, March 21st, 1845, two men were brought before the Cork County Criminal Court. Judges Jackson and Ball were on the bench. A jury was sworn in and Timothy Cremin and Patrick Donoghue were charged Continue reading

On this day, March 19th, 1915

On this day, March 19th, 1915

On this day, March 19th, 1915, Lord Barrymore and his family gathered for the funeral of his mother at the Church in Great Budworth, Cheshire. She was Lady de Tabley, a title she received on her second marriage. Continue reading

On this day, March 14th 1912

On this day, March 14th 1912

On this day, March 14th, 1912, shortly before our national holiday, Dorothy Smith Barry took part in the St Patrick’s Day Sale and Exhibition of the Royal Irish Industries Association in London. The event took place in Continue reading

On this day, March 7th, 1962

On this day, March 7th, 1962

On this day, March 7th, 1962, Belvelly Bridge was flooded as a result of a Spring tide. This bridge is the only link between Fota Island and Great Island. At least 400 workers coming from Cobh were stranded on Continue reading

VISIT DOROTHY’S EASTER TRAIL!

VISIT DOROTHY’S EASTER TRAIL!

Join us for a breath of fresh air this Easter at one of Cork’s most idyllic locations, on Friday 19th and Sat 20th April.

The magnificent Arboretum is the setting for Dorothy’s Trail, which will bring the history Continue reading

A PROFUSION OF FUCHSIA AT VICTORIAN WORKING GARDEN

A PROFUSION OF FUCHSIA AT VICTORIAN WORKING GARDEN

Many of us have childhood memories of sucking the nectar from fuchsia flowers or using them to create figures. Some people considered it unlucky to take it into the house. Even the Irish name for the plant -“Deora Dé”, God’s tears – was fascinating.  These memories come back to us as we work this summer in the “buzzing” glasshouses of Fota Victorian Working Garden. Great, lumbering bumblebees are busy visiting the many varieties of Fuchsia. Magellanica (alba), Riccartonii, Pink Goon, Tom Thumb, Thalia, Mrs Popple, Nellie Nuttall, Sleepy and the wonderfully named, voluptuous Voodoo. Fuchsia was introduced to Ireland for hedging and a walk at this time of year on a country road in West Cork or Kerry bears this out. A constant stream of bees crossing the road from one fuchsia hedge to another is common. It’s like being on a bee highway.

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A Small Blue Goddess

A Small Blue Goddess

In the Frameyard now we see a beautiful tiny flower, with an equally beautiful name. Diana, Greek goddess of the hunt + ella meaning small + native to Tasmania, gives us Dianella tasmanica or Blue Flax Lily.

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