Fota History Nuggets – Stories From Cork, Ireland and Beyond

On this day, April 14th, 1894, Dorothy Elizabeth Smith Barry was born at 20, Hill Street, the family’s London home.

Dorothy’s mother, Elizabeth Wadsworth Post, an American, was 43 and Continue reading
On this day, April 5th, 1894

On this day, April 5th, 1894

On this day, April 5th, 1894, an advertisement for Belvelly Bricks was published in the Cork Constitution newspaper. The advertisement read: “A large quantity of these excellent bricks now in Yard. Pressed and moulded bricks in different shapes, either Continue reading

On this day, April 4th, 1886

On this day, April 4th, 1886

#FotaHistoryNuggets…📚

On this day, April 4th, 1886, Robert Raymond Smith Barry was born in London. His father was James Hugh Smith Barry, his mother Charlotte Cole.

When his uncle, Lord Barrymore died without a male heir in 1925, Continue reading

VISIT DOROTHY’S EASTER TRAIL!

VISIT DOROTHY’S EASTER TRAIL!

Join us for a breath of fresh air this Easter at one of Cork’s most idyllic locations, on Friday 19th and Sat 20th April.

The magnificent Arboretum is the setting for Dorothy’s Trail, which will bring the history Continue reading

Remembering John Charles Beswick

Remembering John Charles Beswick

Remembering John Charles Beswick: 5/10/1888 – 22/4/1917

A monument was unveiled last weekend commemorating 200 East Cork men who died in World War 1. This memorial was the culmination of three years of work by a group of local people. Continue reading

What is an Arboretum?

What is an Arboretum?

An arboretum is a collection of different trees that can be cultivated for pleasure and beauty – such as in a very large garden or plantation. Or it may be used for the botanical study of the tree specimens contained in it.  The name comes from arbor, the Latin word for tree.

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The Fernery at Fota

The Fernery at Fota

The Fernery at Fota House

In the second half of the 19th century there was a craze for ferns.  This obsession came to be known as ‘fern fever’ or pteridomania – named after the Latin name for ferns which is pteridophytes. Ferns were collected, studied and admired on a very, very wide scale.  As well as becoming a feature in gardens and as houseplants the fern was ubiquitous as a decorative motif.  Fern patterns could be found on glassware, china, fabric, pottery, stucco and much more.  In fact if you look carefully at the corbels in the billiard room in Fota – now the café- you can see ferns in the plasterwork.

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